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Sentences

Nancy Schwerner, Joan, and Julius Lester in front of the White House, 1964. Marching to demand the federal government protect civil rights workers in Mississippi (including Nancy's brother-in-law Mickey Schwerner). The government, tragically, waited until too late to provide protection.

 

 I, who love words so much, am surprised to find myself newly enchanted with the sentence as a unit of language. Sentences in all their delicious variety, some with many clauses, dipping in and out, amplifying a theme before it brings itself, sharply, to a halt.

 

Or long sentences that make you think, having to puzzle out their meaning, like digging into a pomegranate to get the sweet, juicy seeds. Laborious, but usually worth it. Then there are the short, declarative sentences that command attention. Look up! they say.

 

The lowly sentence, which all of us use every day, is the building block of prose.  Read More 

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